Japanese Noodles Guide: NOODLEGRAPHIC!

Japanese Noodles Guide: NOODLEGRAPHIC!

OK, so you probably already know about ramen noodles, but what other kinds of Japanese noodles are there? Noodles are a staple of the Japanese diet and surprisingly, most of the noodles they eat are not rice-based. But what are these other types of noodles? And what kind of noodle dishes do they make? Do you eat them hot or cold? Do you know when to eat soba noodles? Or what shirataki noodles are made out of? What’s the difference between somen and udon noodles? If you ever had any burning questions about noddles in Japan, this noodlegraphic is just for you! (more…)

New Feature: Drill Mastery

New Feature: Drill Mastery

Ask and ye shall receive: Drill Mastery has arrived!

We know lots of users were feeling overwhelmed with the same drills in their dojo again and again. So we have finally released Drill Mastery!
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Learn Japanese: 5 Untranslatable Japanese Words

Learn Japanese: 5 Untranslatable Japanese Words

In every language there are certain untranslatable words for which we have no equivalent in English. And Japanese is no different. Oftentimes these words can say a lot about what is important to a culture. The Greeks had many different words for love, and Inuit languages famously have dozens of words for snow. But what things are most important to the Japanese to describe? With this post you can learn 5 untranslatable Japanese words to add to your vocabulary! (more…)

Blue Traffic Lights and more Traditional Japanese Color differences you need to know!

Blue Traffic Lights and more Traditional Japanese Color differences you need to know!

So why isn’t green a color in Japan? Well, today it is. But it wasn’t always one of the Japanese colors. The Japanese people could always see the color green (of course), but for a long time they didn’t have a word for it. It was thought of as just another shade of blue. The word for blue, 青 (ao), actually refers to more of a blue/green. When the word for green came into usage during the Heian period (794 – 1185), 緑 (midori) was still thought of as a shade of blue, and not a separate color. In fact there are many green things today that the Japanese still refer to as ao.

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